Celebrating 125 Years

Mercedes Benz Stadium: Home to the 2019 Super Bowl, Sustainable Practices

Mercedes Benz Stadium: Home to the 2019 Super Bowl,
Sustainable Practices

From AHR Today, 2019

One of the world’s most sustainable sports stadiums nests feet from the Georgia World Congress Center.

Home to the Atlanta Falcons and Atlanta United—the most recent winner of the Major League Soccer Cup—and this year’s Super Bowl, Mercedes Benz Stadium opened in 2017 and is the first professional sports stadium in the world to achieve LEED Platinum certification.

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Home to the Atlanta Falcons, Atlanta United and this year’s Super Bowl, Mercedes Benz Stadium is the first professional sports stadium in the world to achieve LEED Platinum certification.
Courtesy of Mercedes Benz Stadium

Resembling a nest on the outskirts of downtown Atlanta, the stadium’s sustainable practices and state-of-the-art technology allow for quality fan experiences.

The two million ft2 (185 806 m2) stadium, in aggregate, uses 47% less water than baseline (EPA Act 1992) standards thanks to water-efficient fixtures and conservation infrastructure, according to stadium management.

A 600,000 ft2 (55 742 m2) cistern recaptures and reuses rainwater, according to HOK design, architecture, engineering and planning firm. This process helps protect the surrounding area from flooding and provides rainwater to irrigate trees throughout Atlanta.

The stadium’s 4,000 solar photovoltaic panels can power nine Atlanta Falcons games or 13 Atlanta United matches.

The solar panels are integrated into the roof and façade’s design, allowing for maximum daylight, according to stadium officials.

Seven 19800 volt/3000 kva utility transformers from two separate utility vault locations supply the stadium’s power.

The stadium’s 82,500 ft2 (7 665 m2) of LED lighting reduces energy use by as much as 60%.

Versatile and Adaptable

The stadium’s kinetic roof is the building’s centerpiece.

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Eight triangular petals move along 16 tracks to open and close the stadium’s roof like a camera aperture, aiding passive cooling strategies. Courtesy of Mercedes Benz Stadium 

Eight triangular ethylene tetrafluoroethylene (ETFE) petals move in unison along 16 tracks to open and close like a camera aperture. This aids passive cooling strategies.

More than 310,000 ft2 (28 800 m2) of ETFE material is used around the stadium’s façade, including its 22,664 ft2 (2 106 m2) “window to the city” that is more than 16 stories high.

Each petal structure is clad with air-inflated ETFE pillows, totaling more than 143,689 ft2 (13 349.1 m2) of the translucent material. The material is durable and, even when the petals are in the closed, water-tight position, the material allows for light in the stadium.

Because the stadium houses the football and soccer teams as well as hosts other events such as concerts, it was designed to be scalable and easily reconfigured to best suit each event.

Retractable seats surround the field and an automated curtain system that is attached the roof comes down to bring soccer fans closer to the pitch.

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A first-of-its-kind HD halo video board is built into the roof. The video board is three football fields end-to-end.
Courtesy of Mercedes Benz Stadium 

Inside the stadium, a first-of-its-kind 360-degree HD halo video board is built into the roof.

The video board is 60,000 ft2 (5 574 m2). Its dimensions (58 ft [17.7 m] high and 1,075 ft [327.7 m] long) equals three football fields end-to-end and is more than three times larger than any other display in the NFL.

The halo structure’s design is both strong and flexible enough to accommodate the movement of the roof structure. The load it supports or by wind or seismic factors did not dictate the design, according to stadium management.

Mercedes Benz Stadium juggles its multiple teams and events just as well as it manages its energy and water use.

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