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ASHRAE Membership

ASHRAE membership is open to any person associated with heating, ventilation, air conditioning or refrigeration. ASHRAE is unique because its membership is drawn from a wide range of disciplines relating to the HVAC&R field. Approximately 51,000 individuals from more than 100 nations belong to the Society.

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ASHRAE members earn 15% off publications. Hundreds of titles are available including the complete collection of ASHRAE Standards including 90.1, 62.1 and 189.1.
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Resources & Publications
 

0813-CompletedResearch

Completed Research - August 2013


The final reports for the following research projects are available for free for ASHRAE members. Visit www.ashrae.org/research and log in to gain access. The ASHRAE Transactions papers are available for $5 for ASHRAE members at www.ashrae.org/bookstore.

1353

Variable air volume (VAV) systems with direct digital controllers (DDC) have been widely adopted in HVAC systems as they can provide better energy efficiency and occupant comfort. However, engineers do not have the complete set of tools to determine how low of a flow VAV boxes can stably control. This low flow instability can result in problems including under ventilation, uneven control, reduced damper and operator life, and energy waste. 1353-RP, “Stability and Accuracy of VAV Box Control at Low Flows,” studied the source of these VAV inaccuracy and instability to better understand and design for the low flow issue. Two papers on this project have been submitted for future publication in ASHRAE HVAC&R Research Journal. 1353-RP, “Stability and Accuracy of VAV Box Control at Low Flows,” was sponsored by TC 1.4, Control Theory and Application. The principal investigator was Dr. Jin Wen with Drexel University.

1493

1493-RP, “CFD Shootout Contest – Predication of Duct Fitting Losses,” involved a contest to determine duct fitting loss coefficients using a commercially available CFD modeling tool. The research evaluated the feasibility and accuracy of using CFD techniques to numerically determine the loss coefficients for duct fittings. Results are presented in the report. Technical papers on this project were published in ASHRAE Transactions (Vol. 119 (2), DE-13-030) and HVAC&R Research Journal (Vol. 18(6), Dec. 2012) are now available. 1493-RP, “CFD Shootout Contest—Predication of Duct Fitting Losses,” was sponsored by TC 5.2, Duct Design. The principal investigators were Dr. Ahmad Sleiti with University of North Carolina-Charlotte and Dr. John Zhai with the University of Colorado.

1522

1522-RP, “Establishment of Design Procedures to Predict Room Airflow Requirements in Partially Mixed Room Air Distribution Systems,” developed a design guideline and design tool with graphical interface for Underfloor Air Distribution (UFAD) systems to help predict thermal stratification provided by these partially mixed room air distribution systems. These tools, described in the final report, can be used to estimate supply airflow requirements of UFAD systems not currently available in the UFAD Guide: Design, Construction and Operation of Underfloor Air Distribution Systems or the ASHRAE Handbook. Engineers will be able to have a quick and reasonable estimation of airflow and room temperature using this design tool. Two technical papers were published in ASHRAE HVAC&R Research Journal (Vol. 18(6), Dec. 2012) and are now available. 1522-RP, “Establishment of Design Procedures to Predict Room Airflow Requirements in Partially Mixed Room Air Distribution Systems,” was sponsored by TC 5.3, Room Air Distribution. The principal investigator was Zheng Jiang with Building Energy and Environmental Engineering.

1583

1583-RP, “Assessment of Burning Velocity Test Methods,” compared the two burning velocity test methods referenced in ASHRAE Standard 34 to determine if they were appropriate for the mildly flammable refrigerants classified as “subclass 2L.” The two flammability tests (vertical-tube & Schlieren) were originally developed for highly flammable fuels and not intended to be applied to mildly flammable refrigerants. The research evaluated the precision and accuracy of each test method and to seek potential for test method simplification and cost reductions without sacrificing quality. The results of the research project and proposed changes to the test methods for 2L refrigerants are described in the final report. Two technical papers on this project were published in ASHRAE Transactions (Vol. 119 (2), DE-13-022, DE-13-023) and are now available.

1583-RP, “Assessment of Burning Velocity Test Methods,” was sponsored by TC 3.1, Refrigerants and Secondary Coolants. The principal investigator was Dr. Kenji Takizawa with National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science Technology.

1448

ASHRAE Standard 15 includes a formula for mechanical ventilation required to exhaust refrigerant from a refrigeration machinery room in the event of a leak. Major model building codes have adopted ventilation requirements based on the equation in this Standard which only considers the mass of the refrigerant in the room. This equation dates back to the 1930s and the engineering basis is not clear. 1448-RP, “Ventilation Requirements for Refrigerating Machinery Rooms,” developed a new exhaust ventilation calculation based on factors including the size of the space, the refrigerant mass, refrigerant properties, accident scenarios and additional factors. A technical paper on this project was published in ASHRAE Transactions (Vol. 118 (2), SA-12-014) and is now available. 1448-RP, “Ventilation Requirements for Refrigerating Machinery Rooms,” was sponsored by TC 4.3, Ventilation Requirements and Infiltration. The principal investigator was Dr. Ron Petersen with CPP Inc.

1216

Data to help designers accurately predicting the aerodynamic and acoustical response of centrifugal fans with airfoil (AF) and backward inclined (BI) blades to common appurtenances and cabinet design at the fan inlet is limited. To better understand the real world performance of these fans, 1216-RP, “Inlet Installation Effects on Bi/Airfoil Centrifugal Fans, Air and Sound,” studied the effect of various appurtenances including various bearings, bearing supports, inlet guide vanes at various angular positions, inlet boxes, inlet duct elbows at various angles and distances from the inlet, inlet duct contractions, walls perpendicular to the fan axis at various distances from the inlet, cabinet enclosures of various configurations, flex duct connections, inlet and belt guards and bird screens. The results will serve as a guide to those designing or specifying AF and BI fan systems for office and commercial buildings. A technical paper has been submitted for future publication in ASHRAE Transactions. 1216-RP, “Inlet Installation Effects on Bi/Airfoil Centrifugal Fans, Air and Sound,” was sponsored by TC 5.1, Fans. The principal investigators were Mr. Mark Stevens with AMCA and Mr. Alain Guedel with CETIAT.

1415

Tubular daylighting devices (TDD) have emerged as alternative to conventional skylights. However, prediction of the thermal and lighting performance of TDDs is difficult as reliable and accurate calculation methods and design tools are not available. Such tools would allow designers to predict the energy performance of installed TDDs, to show compliance with building energy codes, and to rate existing and/or innovative products. 1415-RP, “Thermal and Lighting Performance Metrics of Tubular Daylighting Devices,” presents some computational algorithms and metrics for the lighting and thermal performance of TDDs to fill this need. Technical papers on this project were published in ASHRAE Transactions (Vol. 117(2), MT-11-021) and HVAC&R Research Journal (Vol. 19(1), Jan.2013 & Vol. 19(3), Apr.2013) and are now available. 1415-RP, “Thermal and Lighting Performance Metrics of Tubular Daylighting Devices,” was sponsored by TC 4.5, Fenestration. The principal investigator was Dr. Aziz Laouadi with NRCC.

1580

Comprehensive risk assessments of 2L refrigerants are needed to evaluate their use in residential and small commercial applications. 1580-RP, “Study of Parameters for Risk Assessment of 2L Flammable Refrigerants in Residential Air Conditioning and Small Commercial Refrigeration Applications,” performed CFD simulations, concentration mapping tests, and ignition tests to determine leak scenarios for selected 2L refrigerants that may result in flammable concentrations. 1580-RP, “Study of Parameters for Risk Assessment of 2L Flammable Refrigerants in Residential Air Conditioning and Small Commercial Refrigeration Applications,” was sponsored by TC 3.1, Refrigerants and Secondary Coolants. The principal investigator was William Goetzler with Navigant Consulting.