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Search Results for: mold and moisture

IAQ Applications: Mold and Dampness

Journal

This month's IAQ Applications explores the new 2012 ASHRAE Position Document, “Limiting Indoor Mold and Dampness in Buildings.” It also discusses a form done by the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), one of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that can be used to assess moisture and mold in schools and other buildings during workplace health hazard evaluations.

Assessing Mold in Buildings

Journal

Mold colonizes buildings when a spore finds the coincidence of moisture, nutrient and shelter. Susan Doll1 conducted a series of experiments at the Harvard School of Public Health demonstrating, among other things, that building materials from the retail supplier arrive already inoculated with mold spores. Other portions of the research support the idea that mold growth can be expected in sheltered locations where materials containing carbon (especially sugars and starches) are exposed to liquid water for several days or relative humidity levels of 95% for several weeks.

Preventing Mold by Keeping New Construction Dry

Journal

When a new building smells moldy, the owner's first phone call is often to the building's HVAC designer. To most people, moldy odors suggest HVAC problems. But while the air system may indeed spread fungal odors, the HVAC system in new buildings is seldom responsible for generating them. In new construction, mold infestations usually are caused by moisture in building materials. That moisture can come from rain or snow before the building is closed in, or from leaking water pipes, wet concrete or condensation on surfaces like cold floor slabs during springtime.

Mold and Moisture Management in Buildings

Book

Mold and Moisture Management in Buildings

Standard 62.1-2007: Moisture and Mold Control, (I-P), 2.4 PDHs (AIA)

Professional Development

Standard 62.1-2007 requires all airstream surfaces in a HVAC system, except sheet metal and fasteners surfaces, be resistant to mold growth and erosion. The course explains the management of HVAC systems in relation to unwanted entrainment and intrusio

Standard 62.1-2007: Moisture and Mold Control, (I-P), 2.4 PDHs (AIA)

Professional Development

Standard 62.1-2007 requires all airstream surfaces in a HVAC system, except sheet metal and fasteners surfaces, be resistant to mold growth and erosion. The course explains the management of HVAC systems in relation to unwanted entrainment and intrusio

Preventing Defect Claims in Hot, Humid Climates

Journal

Mold and moisture claims cost insurers approximately $200 million in 2000, resulting in 50% higher insurance premiums. This article shows how to control moisture in the building envelope and systems, which is considered the most reliable way to prevent a problem associated with 84% of construction defect claims.

Improved Model to Predict Mold Growth in Building Materials

Conference Proceeding

Improved Model to Predict Mold Growth in Building Materials

EIFS Hygrothermal Performance Due to Initial Construction Moisture as a Function of Air Leakage, Interior Cavity Insulation, and Climate Conditions

Conference Proceeding

EIFS Hygrothermal Performance Due to Initial Construction Moisture as a Function of Air Leakage, Interior Cavity Insulation, and Climate Conditions


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